History of the peoples Of Zimbabwe RSS



How the Ox-Wagon and transport-rider opened up Zimbabwe

Hans Sauer says the trek ox is the real pioneer of the southern African sub-continent. They dragged the wagons across the whole of South Africa and crossed the Limpopo and Shashe Rivers (Botswana) and then across the Lundi (Runde) to Victoria (Masvingo) and finally Salisbury (Harare). Before the coming of the railways it was the trek ox that provided all the transport leading to the development of the diamond fields at Kimberley and the goldfields of the Witwatersrand and finally the occupation of Mashonaland and conquest of Matabeleland. The trek ox brought from the coast into the interior all the food, furniture, clothing, household utensils, corrugated sheeting, timber, heavy machinery required for mining, the portable steam engines that provided power...

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The arrival of the AmaNdebele in Matabeleland and the succession of King Lobengula

This article is from the Oral History Statement of Ntabeni Kumalo, son of Mhwebi, who was a son of Mzilikazi, made to Foster Windram on the farm of J.P. Richardson on 19th and 24th November 1937 with J.P. Richardson and Peter Kumalo when he was a journalist at he Bulawayo Chronicle in 1937 with those persons in their home kraals who had personal knowledge of the events that had taken place.

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History of the Zanj/Zanze

Did you know? History of the Zanj/Zanze People In about the 1st century AD, the Zanj also known as the Zanze people immigrated to the East African coast from an area believed to be south of Lake Chad. After sojourning for an unknown number of years in what is today The Central African Republic, southern Sudan and southwestern Ethiopia they arrived in the Tana River valley around the fourth decade of the 1st Century AD. They were led by a very strong, tall, dark and able leader called Chirongo of the baboon/monkey totem (Soko). The Zanj were very dark in complexion. It is believed that by the 3rd century AD, the domain of the Zanze extended from an area above...

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A brief synopsis of Zimbabwe

A brief synopsis of Zimbabwe. Zimbabwe is a mixture of people. More than two-thirds of the population speaks Shona as their first language. Shona-speaking people live mainly in the eastern two-thirds of the country, including the capital of Harare, and are made up of the following groups: Karanga, Korekore, Manyika, Ndau, Rozwi  Zezuru Around one in five Zimbabweans (the Ndebele and Kalanga groups) speak Northern Ndebele, commonly known as Sindebele. Both Shona and Sindebele are Bantu languages originating from the time when Bantu-speaking tribes populated the region over 1000 years ago. The Shona tribe is Zimbabwe's largest indigenous group whose tribal language is also called Shona (Bantu). Their population is around 9 million. They are the largest ethnic group in...

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Shava/ Mhofu Clan

Did you know that Shava is a totem name variant of Mhofu/Mpofu, which is the name of the Eland that is common in Southern Africa. The meanings attached to Shava include the fairness of the coat, resembling the colours of the Eland, or becoming self-sufficient such as by hunting or fishing (Kushava). In their praise poetry they use terms such as Mhofuyemukono (the bull eland) and Mhukahuru (the large beast). All descendants of Mbiru share the same totem of Shava, but some changed to various Chidawos over time (praise name in parentheses) to hide from their enemies. Shava is associated with the Vahera tribe, descendants of Mbiru, who lived at Gombe Hill in present-day Buhera, East of Zimbabwe. The Vahera...

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